Sir David Chipperfield

Sir David Chipperfield

The mentor

Published in 2017

Driven by an approach to architecture that values “substance, permanence and meaning” above spectacle, and shuns a particular house style, British architect Sir David Chipperfield has gained renown for a diverse body of work that spans civic and cultural buildings, houses, hotels and offices, as well as shop interiors, furniture, lighting and tableware. Chipperfield trained at the Kingston School of Art and London’s Architectural Association before beginning work for some of Britain’s leading architects. In 1985 he started his own practice, and today employs more than 250 people in his London, Berlin, Milan and Shanghai offices, with a focus is on providing architecturally, socially and intellectually coherent designs.

Among his notable buildings are numerous museums such as the River & Rowing Museum in Henley-on-Thames, the Figge Art Museum in Iowa, the reconstructed Neues Museum in Berlin (where he is currently designing a new entry building to the city’s Museum Island) and the Museo Jumex in Mexico City. In 2011, the year he was awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal for Architecture, he completed two UK galleries, Turner Contemporary in Margate, which in 2015 was chosen as one of the 21 landmarks that define Britain in the 21st century, and The Hepworth Wakefield in Yorkshire. Other ongoing projects include the Nobel Center in Stockholm, an expansion of the Kunsthaus Zürich in Switzerland and the restoration of the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin. Chipperfield was selected in 2015 to redesign the modern and contemporary art wing and adjacent areas of New York’s Metropolitan Museum and to reconfigure and renovate London’s Royal Academy of Arts with the inclusion of 6 Burlington Gardens. In 2012, he curated the Venice Architecture Biennale, the first British practising architect to serve as curator. Knighted in 2010 for his services to architecture in the UK and Germany, Chipperfield received the Praemium Imperiale prize in 2013 in recognition of a lifetime’s work. He has taught worldwide, including at the Yale School of Architecture and the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Stuttgart.